What are the EU institutions doing to lead on Distributed Ledger Technology?

Written by Annie Scanlan on 06 Sep 2018

Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT), sometimes referred to as blockchain, is coming under increased scrutiny by policy makers in the EU institutions. We have produced a one page guide highlighting the key initiatives which companies using DLT should be following.

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What does the Industrial Strategy say about a low carbon strategy in the UK?

Written by Inline Policy on 09 Feb 2017

To a rather muted fanfare, the British Government published its industrial strategy green paper last month. As far as the energy and climate change audience were concerned, in the run-up to the publication of the strategy, the Business Energy and Industrial Strategy Department (BEIS) – a department still in its infancy - was essentially facing two challenges:

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Full steam ahead for the EU in 2017 on Banking Regulation and Capital Markets Union

Written by Inline Policy on 19 Dec 2016

2017 is set to be a year of acceleration in the pace of regulation of the financial services sector at global and European levels. The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) is making steady progress on plans including a leverage ratio surcharge for global systemically important institutions (G-SIIs).

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Crowdfunding: Maturing with Regulation

Written by Conor Brennan on 01 Sep 2016

In July, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) – the body that regulates loan-based and investment-based crowdfunding in the UK – launched a ‘call for input’ on the current rules applied to crowdfunding in the UK.

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eSports gambling – regulators take a closer look

Written by Inline Policy on 24 Aug 2016

The prospect of video gamers becoming paid professionals, and people placing bets on the outcome of contests, would have seemed unthinkable a few years ago.

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Membership vs access: Why words have meaning for the future of UK financial services and the Single Market

Written by Inline Policy on 26 Jul 2016

Some of the UK political instability following the EU Referendum in June is beginning to dissipate. A new Prime Minister, reshuffled Ministerial teams, and reshaped Government machinery are in place. A timetable of sorts for the next steps is beginning to form, ie. no triggering of Article 50 to commence the departure negotiations, during this calendar year, but likely early in 2017. What is still concealed in opacity is any inkling of what the UK position might be in the parallel discussions on a future economic and co-operative relationship with the EU. 

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Out of the low growth trap: the limits of central bank power in boosting economic output

Written by Inline Policy on 06 Jun 2016

Last week’s gloomy Global Economic Outlook from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (the OECD) raises further questions on the degree of reliance placed by policymakers on monetary policy as an engine to boost output in a low growth, ultra-low inflation, economic environment. Markit Economics’ recent study of combined PMI indicators for the UK and the Eurozone indicated growth in the second quarter of 2016 of 0.2% and 0.3% in each respective market. The OECD downgraded the forecast for UK GDP growth in 2016 to 1.7%.

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The CMA Interim Report on Remedies: A more competitive UK retail banking sector or missed opportunity?

Written by Inline Policy on 27 May 2016

Last week’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) set of interim recommendations on the UK retail banking sector represents the culmination of nearly two years work from the new competition regulator analysing plans for structural, market, and anti-trust reform of the industry. It is important to remember the political context which gave rise to the enquiry. 

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What would Brexit mean for the investment climate in the financial sector?

Written by Inline Policy on 13 May 2016

With just six weeks left to go, the battle over the UK’s continued membership of the European Union is rising in volume and intensity. A key issue for investors in UK-traded financial services products and markets is undoubtedly what effects the decision made on June 23 will have on the climate for purchasing or retaining bonds, equities or other assets linked to either the performance of sterling or the stock market. Ultimately these are reflections on the underlying health of the UK economy itself, and the likely economic temperature if the UK stays within or leaves the Single Market, both in the short term and medium-to-long term.

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